Among the usual misplaced items, Property and Evidence Clerk Karen Baghdassarian has had her fair share of odd things brought to her. “It always surprises me [what gets turned in],” she says.

John Novak / Courier These books, bags, and other items are just a snippet of the other countless things that take up space in the Lost and Found closet in the police station on Wednesday, Feb. 6.
John Novak / Courier
These books, bags, and other items are just a snippet of the other countless things that take up space in the Lost and Found closet in the police station on Wednesday, Feb. 6.

Some unusual lost items have included a full croquet set, a baby stroller, and a violin. A number of other unexpected items have been turned in, such as shoes, computers and I.D. cards from other colleges. According to Baghdassarian, the items most commonly turned in to the Lost and Found are flash drives and cellphones.

In January, 210 items were turned in to Lost and Found, and 82 of those items were returned to their owners. In December, 153 items were turned in and 39 were returned.

The owners of lost items are identified and contacted via email or phone call. When important items, such as car keys, are brought in, Baghdassarian does her best to get them back to their owners before she leaves for the day at 2 p.m. Baghdassarian works at PCC part-time; she is in the Lost and Found office Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Lost items are kept for 90 days, then are either donated or destroyed, according to Baghdassarian. Drivers licenses, passports, and other legal documents are returned to the issuing agency. Electronic devices such as flash drives and iPods are wiped clean after being in Lost and Found for 90 days. “Legally we have to keep things for 90 days,” she says.

Some students aren’t aware of the Lost and Found services until they lose something. Isaac Mateo, undecided, is one of them. “I didn’t even know we had a Lost and Found [until I was asked],” says Mateo.

According to Baghdassarian, the number of items turned in by cadets is about the same as the number of items turned in by students and other people on campus. “We have very honest people here,” she said.

Some students, like Kathleen Little, rely on the honesty of people to find their lost items. “If I ever lose something, I always go back to the last place I remember [having] it and ask the people who are in the area if they saw it or if they someone else with it. If [they haven’t seen it], I would go to campus police or Lost and Found,” says Little who is a T.V./Film Production Studies major.

Baghdassarian cautions people to put their names on everything. “If you have a flash drive, put your resume on it. Thats the first thing I look for,” she said.

She also suggests putting contact information as the screensaver on iPhones in case the phone is locked. Baghdassarian wants to return as many items as possible, but also thinks people should take responsibility and put their names on their stuff.

“I try to return as much as possible,” says Baghdassarian. “We’d love [to return] 100 percent, but thats not going to happen.”

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.