Riots, thefts and murder

8 – Escaping the Riot Alfredo Santana, a PCC student who immigrated to America from Mexico, thought he wouldn’t make it home that night. Driving to drop off magazines at a 7-11 in Inglewood during the L.A. Riots of 1992, Santana was terrified out of his mind when he was stopped by a group of men in the road. The men proceeded to jam a large metal flag into his windshield, kicked open his rear window, and dragged him out of the car. He was …

An adviser’s legacy

She arrived on campus at Pasadena City College during the early morning and had no clue where she was going. No schedule and absolutely no information on hand that could alleviate her anxiousness. To gain some knowledge of where she needed to be, she proceeded nervously into the human resources office. Shortly after being accompanied to her new office, she received a call from the campus print shop asking about the deadline for that week’s paper. Having no retort, she continued onward to meet her …

The digital editor’s daily beat

Reporters will get through any barrier as long as it means getting the story. However, it’s the editor-in-chief who is always one step ahead of the game in order to keep the attention of multi-tasking readers. Being ready for anything would be the one necessity all past editors-in-chief of the Courier can agree on. Since its inception, the purpose of the Courier has been to deliver news to students written by PCC’s next generation of young journalists.

Cataloging civil rights

Over the course of a century, the Pasadena High School Chronicle, now the Pasadena City College Courier, has seen multiple social paradigm shifts. As the decades passed, the social attitudes of the general public, and by extension the Chronicle/Courier staff, changed as advancements in civil rights were made, most notably with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which brought an end to segregation and made institutional discrimination illegal.