David Olvera / Courier A photo of “Colour Blind”, an album released by Seaway on Monday, October 21, 2019.
SHARE: FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

Ontario quintet Seaway delivers the true meaning of funky and fun in their 2015 LP “Colour Blind.” From side A to B the zest and glee never stops, every song on this record provokes a smile. The pop-punk genre has long been a dying one, but Seaway is here with a defibrillator to jump start the scene all over again. By using a plethora of power chords, some trashy lead vocals and chanty choruses, “Colour Blind” crashes into the listener’s ear with a slice of pizza in one hand and a skateboard in the other. 

Instrumentally, this record is exactly what is expected from pop-punk work. A healthy serving of simple guitar melodies, sporadic drums, and bass that sort of takes a back seat. Dual vocalists Ryan Locke and Patrick Carleton are beauty and the beast. Locke gives this album the usual fun, yelly and not very talented sounding vocals, and Carleton usually tackles the choruses with grace. While this is a pop-punk record, it is refined and cleaned up quite a bit. From their earlier releases “Hoser” and “All In My Head” to “Colour Blind” Seaway has shown a tremendous amount of growth. From one release to the next their talent improves and it can be easily heard. This continuing growth is what makes “Colour Blind” special and a pop-punk record that is actually worth listening to.  

Lyrically, Seaway gives the typical sad-boy speech about girls some new depth. While very much still cliche, this record is not just about “boo-hoo my girlfriend dumped me” but includes messages about self-reflection and just wanting to have some fun. Their lyrics range from the serious and sad, to the ironic and comical giving this record some added depth. “So maybe I’m a freak and nobody knows my name/And nobody gets that strange to me is ordinary/Maybe I’m a freak and nobody knows my name/And nobody gets that strange to me is ordinary/So maybe I’m a freak but you freak me out/(You freak me out)/(You freak me out).” Lyrics from jumpy number four “Freak” are a solid example of the lighthearted lyrics of this record. Being self proclaimed freaks, Seaway’s lyrics make their dorky side very apparent. 

The eighth track “Airhead” shows their sweet and serious side. This track is definitely a song for a listener’s sweetheart. “Sometimes I can be a fucking airhead/So tie me to your fingertips so I don’t float away/Sometimes I think I’d rather be alive than dead/So tie me to your fingertip/Crush me girl, crush my dreams/Show me pain, show me what gravity means/Pull me down to my knees/Make me real I’m begging you please/(Cause I know that you love me).” Using lovey-dovey lyrics and playfully light instrumentals, Seaway flatters the listeners time and time again.

“Colour Blind” is a cleaner and improved version of whiny skatepark punk. While still talking about girls and being awkward, Seaway breathes new life into the nearly dead body of the pop-punk scene. Veterans of the genre are certain to feel a rush of nostalgia and joy. Seaway invites listeners put on the old Vans and skinny jeans to go out and get a slice of ‘za.  

Recommended Track: “Stubborn Love”

Favorite Track: “Slam”

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.