John Chaides / Courier Hardhats is one item that is inside the many shelfs inside the emergence bin at Pasadena City College, taken on Tuesday, October 10, 2017. The emergence bin has various items in preperation for an earthquake and other natural disasters.
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The movement of an earthquake can devastate places within a couple of seconds. It is a sudden motion that occurs when one least expects it, and although no earthquakes in California has been nearly as destructive as the “Great Quake” of 1906 in San Francisco, one can never underestimate the importance of being ready.

“The fear was bigger for me because my family was in Mexico City during this recent earthquake,” said PCC student Rebecca Sarahi, whose parents lived through the earthquake in Mexico back in 1985.

In the wake of the earthquake that took place in Mexico City this year, Sarahi decided to gather equipment together that will help her in the case of an emergency.

“It was a reminder that we need to be prepared. An earthquake is likely to happen in Los Angeles,” said Sarahi.

The earthquake drill happening at PCC, which is statewide, will take place on Thursday October 19th at 10:19 a.m.

“There’s been a lot [going on recently] that’s indicated that this drill is more important than ever,” said Executive Director of Chief Communications and Marketing, Alex Boekelheide.

Preparedness when at school is a way to be ready for catastrophic events, which is a matter the Police and College Services department have taken into their hands.

According to Sgt. Bill Abernathie, there will be Building and floor supervisors at each section and building on campus that they are assigned to, evacuating every floor of the building and assisting any victims.

This is just one of many ways in which PCC will be ready for an earthquake.

Another way is making sure students, faculty, and staff know that the evacuations zones on campus include open spaces such as the football field, mirror pool, or any other location that is away from tall buildings, glass, and windows.

However, being prepared oftentimes means spending money on simple necessities such as canned food, water, flashlights, whistles, and more, something that Sarahi was quick to do after recent natural devastations across the U.S. and other countries.

At the end of the day, that’s all that one can do, be ready.

“I think it’s important that we make sure we know how to do and that we’re ready to do it as practice so that when the real event comes, we’re ready to go,” said Boekelheide.

 

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