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New TV production class to shoot events live

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A new television production class that was added this semester looks to eventually stream live video feeds of campus events in the near future, said TV Field Production Instructor Stillman Kelly.

Benjamin Simpson / Courier Amy Khuong (front to back), Brandon Olguin, Jerome Chan, DeMario Ray work on live video at the men's and women's basketball game at the Hutto-Patterson Gym, Feb 15, 2013.  The Television Field Production class is hoping to produce live games to view on the internet in the future.

Benjamin Simpson / Courier
Amy Khuong (front to back), Brandon Olguin, Jerome Chan, DeMario Ray work on live video at the men’s and women’s basketball game at the Hutto-Patterson Gym, Feb 15, 2013. The Television Field Production class is hoping to produce live games to view on the internet in the future.

“Our first task is to train these students so they can get jobs,” said Kelly. “But aspirations for this class are [endless]. We will eventually be shooting concerts and operas here at PCC.”

The TVR 124 students were thrown feet first into the fire at the men’s and women’s basketball games on Feb. 20. Kelly said that “shooting” sports is unlike any other type of filming in that it doesn’t allow for many mistakes, so students have to learn fast as they go along.

“You are going to make mistakes,” said Kelly. “This class is teaching them how to quickly cover up those errors in a calm manner and continue doing the best that they can do.”

Kelly also said that students would soon be able to link up with the new TVR studio in the C Building, and have better editing capabilities when they shoot live events.

Although the class is running smoothly now, new classes introduced to colleges are bound to have a few hiccups and this remains the case for the TV field production class.

“We’re like the guinea pigs,” said Jenny Chen, television production.  “Because we’re the first class. It kind of sucks for us because we don’t get to repeat the class anymore and take away a better portfolio.”

Students say that the class started out “rocky” but they are enjoying their time in the class now, half way into the semester. “We’ve [filmed] five basketball games,” said Chen. “I think we’re getting better now that we actually know what’s going on.”

Amy Khuong, television production, said that there are two or three other cameras that they haven’t gotten yet and need them for the class to be at its full potential.

“I’m looking forward to using more cameras when we get them,” said Khuong. “As of now, we’re only using two cameras, so as a director there really isn’t much work.”

Benjamin Simpson/Courier Gabriel Reyna works a video camera from the top of the stands at the men's and women's basketball games in the Hutto-Patterson Gym, Feb 15, 2013.

Benjamin Simpson/Courier
Gabriel Reyna works a video camera from the top of the stands at the men’s and women’s basketball games in the Hutto-Patterson Gym, Feb 15, 2013.

The lack of the extra cameras is another reason why she would like to be able to retake the class. “I just hope,” said Chen. “That the rest of the equipment will arrive soon. At least then one of the productions will be the way the class was set out to be… But that being said, it is still a good class.”

Kelly said that the next field productions would be a orchestra concert and a jazz concert and that with the different variety in their portfolios, it would make getting a job in the film industry a little easier.

“We’re still working out the kinks with our equipment,” said Khuong. “But with what we have, it’s going pretty well. We all learn from each other in every production.”

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